Question Marks

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The main function of a question mark is to indicate a question or query.

1. Use a question mark at the end of all direct questions:

  • What is your name?
  • How much money did you transfer?
  • Did you send euro or dollars?

2. Use a question mark after a tag question:

  • You’re French, aren’t you?
  • Snow isn’t green, is it?
  • He should go and see a doctor, shouldn’t he?

3. Don’t forget to use a question mark at the end of a sentence that really is a direct question:

  • How else would I get there, after all?
  • What if I said to you, ‘I don’t love you any more’?
  • ‘Who knows when I’ll die?’, he asked rhetorically.

4. Do not use a question mark after an indirect or reported question:

  • The teacher asked them what their names were. (What are your names?)
  • John asked Mary if she loved him. (Do you love me?)
  • I’m wondering if she’s coming. (Is she coming?)

5. Be careful with titles and abbreviations when question marks are involved:

  • ‘Who’s afraid of Virginia Woolf?’ was a play before it was a film.
  • Who’s afraid of Virginia Woolf? was a play before it was a film.
  • Have you seen the film ‘Who’s afraid of Virginia Woolf?’?
  • Have you seen the film Who’s afraid of Virginia Woolf??
  • Have you ever been to L.A.?

Note that there should be no space immediately before a question mark.

Source: englishclub.com

offthemark.com

Remember point 4:

  • ‘Ask yourself if they would be looking at the negatives?’ —this is not a question; it does not end with a question mark.
  • But Ask yourself: ‘Would they be looking at the negatives?’ ♥
  • ‘Ask yourself how you like to learn?’ Again, this is not a question. Use a full stop.
  • But Ask yourself: ‘How do I like to learn?’ ♥

‘Will they be looking at the negatives?’ and ‘How do I like to learn?’ are questions and deserve question marks.

Happy Valentine's Day!

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About Ascension Creative

Ascension Creative brings ideas to life. Always closer to the light.
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